Fabric noticeboard tutorial

Remember that fabric that I used for the sewing stool and was sad that I couldn’t keep? Well, I found a use for the left overs: a new fabric noticeboard. I’m not sure about you but I always have a gazillion bits of paper cluttering the place up and tickets and mementos that I want to hang onto. Well despite already having two noticeboards to cater for this, the paper was mounting again so I thought, why not have a third. And, seeing as cork boards are so darn ugly, it made sense to cover it with that gorgeous fabric.
As you know, I’m never one to spend an hour perfecting something that can be done in 5 minutes flat. This project was no different. I simply stretched the fabric round and used the trusty staple gun (gotta be my favourite thing ever) to attach it to the wooden frame. With some fabrics- like this one- you need to check you’re keeping the pattern straight. After that, I made a ribbon border. As the base is cork, there was no need to glue or staple this on- I just cut it to size and pinned to the board. Then got pinning all my bits and bobs on it. Ta da! No more clutter!

Tutorial: upholstered sewing stool

I’m obviously getting too good at this DIY malarkey.  My mum has set me a ton of  sewing projects to get through.

The first was this manky old moss coloured sewing stool. It’s been sat in a cupboard since I can remember and was in need of a bit of love. We were umming and ahhing about what to do with it. I wanted to recover it with a bold floral print but my mum wanted something plain and oatmeal coloured.

Then, when I was browsing in my local fabric shop I came across this fabric. A compromise if you will: neutral but with a graphic print. I love it and was slightly jealous to be using it for something I can’t keep. Oh well.

Anyway, lazy as I am, I didn’t even bother to take off the old fabric. I simply grabbed my fabric and stapled it over the original stool cover. When it came to the sides I cut four pieces  to length (plus an additional inch for seams) and sewed them together to make a sort of empty box thing (ha- so articulate).

Fortunately my measuring was right and this was a snug fit. I shimmied it up the sides, ensured the seams sat on the corners and stapled the fabric over the top and under the bottom. This required the removal of the feet but they screwed on so it wasn’t tricky.

Then I added the finishing touches in a contrast pink ribbon- a pull tab to open the stool and trim to cover the staples and rough edges of fabric where I’d stapled it on the inside.

Considering this is only my second or third upholstery project, I’m pretty chuffed with how it turned out. I don’t think my staple gun will be in the cupboard for long!

Decoupage lampshade tutorial

Well, as you know, I’ve been super excited to get to grips with the Mod Podge I recently bought. First I had a  few trial sessions re-covering the lids of some boring storage boxes. I was actually pretty happy with how it went. Here are the results:

I just slapped the stuff on with a paintbrush and smoothed the paper over it. One word of warning though, the paper does get air pockets in which you have to press out and as the paper is wet with glue it can disintegrate so be gentle!

After this practice I decided I was ready for my first project. I bought this lamp from ASDA (of all places!) for a bargain price but always planned to spruce it up a bit. I also had some very cute floral fabric that I loved but hadn’t yet found the right project for. After seeing this tutorial, I knew I’d found my spruce!


Here’s how I did it:

  1. Unattach shade from lamp- careful with hot bulbs and turn off the power first!
  2. Trace the circumference of the shade onto the back of the fabric. My shade was pitched so the fabric strip was curved.
  3. Cut the fabric carefully. Here’s your cover.
  4. Cover the entire shade with a layer of Mod Podge.
  5. Wait until it is tacky.
  6. Slowly and CAREFULLY smooth the fabric onto the shade- keeping it lined up.
  7. Smooth out air bubbles as you go- fabric is more forgiving than paper as it’s stretchy so you can manipulate it without ripping it.
  8. Leave to dry for 20 mins- I left it on the lamp stand to prevent the wet glue sticking to any surfaces.
  9. When dry, cover the fabric in a layer of Mod Podge- this seals it and prevents the edges from fraying.
  10. Once dry, add another layer if necessary.

Time for you to get cracking- I’d love to know what you’ve been decoupaging, get in touch or leave a comment!

DIY magnetic fabric noticeboard the lazy way

As you will remember, my new monsoon magnets pressured me into re-covering my whiteboard to complement their loveliness.

You’ll notice that this is a ‘lazy way’ tutorial. Once I decide to do a project, it’s happening, regardless of whether I have the right tools or enough time to do it. Inevitably, things can sometimes be a little botched (by the end of this post you’ll see..) but they usually end  up alright!!

 

This project was a true case in point. I had cute floral fabric, check. And nice magnets, check. A way of attaching the fabric to the board….now that wasn’t as easy. First I tried superglue, that sticks anything right? Wrong. Apparently it doesn’t stick fabric to plastic. Well, what can I say? You learn something every day. Not to be defeated by mere superglue I got to thinking of an alternative.  After a while I found myself thinking, hmmm….uhh…sellotape?

Yes, that’s right, I used sellotape and literally wrapped the board like a big flat present. It wasn’t big and it wasn’t clever but it WORKED, so there. I now have a nice magnetic fabric noticeboard. As long as no one takes it off the wall and looks at the back, they’ll be none the wiser.

DIY French bedside table

After a couple of months searching high and low for a bedside table, I decided there was no way I could afford one that I wanted and no way I wanted one of the ones I could afford!

So, being intrepid DIY-er, I decided to craft my way to the perfect item of bedroom storage.

    

I found a sturdy but hideously orange-y varnished pine bedside table in a local charity shop for £20. I went and bought a random shade of cream paint (out of like 20 options- who knew cream was so complex?) and some beautiful knobs to replace the originals.

After laying down some newspaper and gathering my tools (sandpaper and block, paintbrush…), I got to work. Here’s how I did it.

  1. Remove drawers and unscrew knobs.
  2. Sand the whole cabinet roughly – it doesn’t have to be perfect (this a whole lot more dusty than you think- be warned).
  3. Wipe every surface with a damp cloth to remove dust and leave to dry.
  4. Paint all visible surfaces with a thin layer of paint. I left the inside of the cabinet and drawers in/as plain wood because I liked the contrast and well, it’s easier.Leave to dry- a couple of hours should be enough.
  5. Paint a second coat on.
  6. Leave to dry overnight.
  7. Screw in new knobs.

Hey presto, a French-style piece of furniture for a fraction of the price!